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Our “BOROBUDUR TOUR - MERAPI PACKAGE” includes:

  • Ac Coach

  • Guide Service

  • Accommodation 03 nights at Yogyakarta, twin/triple share basis (lowest category)

  • Meals as per program

  • Entrance fee

  • Daily  Mineral Water per bottle

 

Our Package  does NOT include:

  • Local air ticket : USD 179 / Person (Subject to change depent to availability)

  • Personal Expense

  • Tipping for guide and driver

  • Airport tax

 

Remarks

  • Rate might change without prior notice for HSS/PEAK SEASON (Ied Fitri, Christmas, New Years) and Indonesian Government change policy 

    • Christmas & New Year Eve 2020

  • Tour BASE ON SIC (Seat In Coach) with Min 02 pax traveling

  • Child twin share with adult will be charge 100%

  • Child above 2 and below 12 years and sharing with 2 adult with extra bed, 75% from adult twin price

  • Child above 2 and below 12 years and sharing with 2 adult without extra bed, 60% from adult twin price    

Choice of Hotels

 

3 STARS

TJOKRO STYLE

TWIN SHARING: USD 326

SINGLE SUPPLEMENT: USD 84

VALIDITY Apr 01 - Dec 20 2019

SURCHARGE/ROOM/NIGHT TBA

4 STARS

PRIME PLAZA HOTEL

TWIN SHARING: USD 328

SINGLE SUPPLEMENT: USD 87

VALIDITY Apr 01 - Dec 20 2019

SURCHARGE/ROOM/NIGHT TBA

 

THE 101 TUGU

TWIN SHARING: USD 328

SINGLE SUPPLEMENT: USD 86

VALIDITY Apr 01 - Dec 20 2019

SURCHARGE/ROOM/NIGHT TBA

5 STARS

MELIA PUROSANI

TWIN SHARING: USD 411

SINGLE SUPPLEMENT: USD 171

VALIDITY Apr 01 - Dec 20 2019

SURCHARGE/ROOM/NIGHT TBA

BOROBUDUR TOUR - MERAPI

4D3N

 

Exclusively prepared for MeMinds 2019

 

Book Now:

widya.mentari@panorama-destination.com
rovani.aliff@panorama-destination.com

 

What you will do

 

Day 01 | ARRIVE AT YOGYA, PRAMBANAN TOUR (-/L/D)

 

Suggested to use local airlines schedules : Garuda Indonesia / GA 204 depart from Jakarta at 08.00, arrive in Yogyakarta at 09.20. (Shuttle will depart at 10.30) 

 

Day 02 | LAVA TOUR, BOROBUDUR TOUR, MALIOBORO (B/L/D)

 

Day 03 | CITY TOUR,BATIK HOME INDUSTRY, KOTA GEDE SILVER + OPTIONS GUA PINDUL+ GUA BARU (B/L/D)

Day 04 | TRANSFER OUT JOGJA AIRPORT (B/L/D)

Suggested local airlines schedules : Garuda Indonesia / GA 205 depart from Yogyakarta at 10.05, arrive in Jakarta at 11.25. (Please cross check with your connecting international air ticket)

Other Useful Information

Visa Information

It is your responsibility to ensure that you are in possession of the correct documentation for your holiday and onward travel. Panorama Destination cannot accept responsibility for anyone who is refused entry to the country because they lack the correct documentation. We encourage you to check the latest information with the nearest Indonesian embassy in your country.

The government has recently relaxed the VISA regulations for 168 countries meaning they are eligible to enter Indonesia without a visa for 30 days. The visa free facility does not allow the change into other permits or visa extension. Passport holders from all visa exempt countries can enter Indonesia through one of the 124 designated border crossings.

Local Currency


The local currency in Indonesia is the Indonesia Rupiah (IDR).  The current exchange rate is approximately at USD 1 = IDR 13,000 – 13,500. Major  credit  cards are widely  accepted and  Traveler’s Cheques and  fo-reign currency  are accepted  at most  of the  large hotels  and authorized moneychangers. There are local banks as well as ATM machines in all main towns.

What to bring   
 

Casual and comfortable lightweight clothing is suitable for travelling in Indonesia. Clothing in layers is recommended if travelling to higher altitudes. Dress modestly and don’t wear shorts or sleeveless tops when visiting religious  buildings. Comfortable  walking  shoes are  recommended and they should be removed before entering a private home. Wear a  sarong  and  waist  sashes when  visiting  temples (provided at the entrance). Prepare some change of dry clothes for a day of water activity such as white water rafting

Electricity
 

220 V / 50hz is used in Indonesia. We recommend you to bring along a travel adapter.

Weather


Indonesia enjoys a warm, tropical  climate  year-round with  the most  pleasant  weather  from  April until October when the trade winds blow. The rainy season normally starts in November and usually lasts until March.

Language


The national language, Bahasa Indonesia, is taught  in all  schools. At home  and  in the  markets, the local people speak  their local dialect, e.g. Javanese in  Central and East Java, Balinese  in Bali. English is  increa- singly spoken in the main tourist centers and Dutch is still understood by the older generation.

Tipping and Gratuities
 

It is generally accepted to tip local restaurant staff, luggage porters, drivers and guides. It is however not mandatory. Recommended tipping for guides is between IDR 50,000 to 100,000 (USD 4 to USD 8) per day and for driver it is IDR 50,000 (USD 4) per day.

Notes
 

This itinerary has been carefully designed by our team to showcase unique and recommended experiences. Should you have any question in regards to this tailormade programme, please contact us at info@panorama-destination.com 

 

Recommended reading

Ring of Fire by Dr. Lawrence Blair

Based on the Emmy award-winning documentary series of the same name, Ring of Fire is a first-person account of the adventures of two English brothers as they explore astonishingly rich cultures of the Indonesian islands.

 

The Hidden Force by Louis Couperus (translated by Paul Vincent)
Written by a Dutch writer who had extensive experience of Java and of the Netherlands Indies’ society and civil service; The Hidden Force is a compelling read for anyone curious about the Dutch in Java or more broadly about the psychology of colonialism and the conflict of cultures. The supernatural elements that have a prominnent place in the book could be a problem for rationalist modern readers, but nothing too critical rests on these phenomena, which though not explicable remain largely isolated.   

Mysticism in Java : Ideology in Indonesia by Niels Mulder
Most Javanese are Muslims but there is also a distinctive kejawen, “Javaneseness” incorporating elements of mysticism or kebatinan which are both described in the book as well as the ways in which it has influenced borader Indonesian ideologies. Underlying Javanese mysticism is a complex and elaborate metaphysics. Mulder illustrates this with a case study of lottery prediction in Yogyakarta. He goes on to look at the practice of kebatinan, at the paths to mystical union, the role of masters, the context of meetings, connections with shadow theatre, and so forth, and at its broader ethics and social philosophy. Not as easy to read as it might be, but definitely not dry and very useful for the curious.


Island of Bali by Miguel Covarrubias

Originally published in 1937, it is still considered the most authoritative account of Bali and its fascinating people. A birds-eye view of Balinese life and culture, it includes a survey of the island’s history, geography and social structure, and paints a captivating picture of Balinese art, music and drama. Complementing the text are drawings, half-tone photographs and a full-color insert.

 

A Tale from Bali by Vicky Baum

Vicki Baum’s evocative historical novel recounts the lives of peasants and nobles in colonial Bali, reared against a backdrop of bloodshed and cultural invasion. Dutch imperialism brings upheaval and revolution to the beautiful island, and the Balinese rebel in what would become a powerful and poignant example of symbolic resistance.

A House in Bali by Colin McPhee & James Murdoch

This is a book about passion, obsession and discovery in an amazing land, but also about the voyage of a highly talented composer and writer. A House in Bali remains one of the most remarkable books ever written about the fabled island of Bali. This classic book tells the story of Balinese culture through a history of Balinese music. The young composer writes about his discoveries of music in Bali and growing understanding of an astonishing culture where the arts are a prime preoccupation, and of the arts, music is supreme. Much has been written on Bali, but this classic work from 1947 remains the only narrative by a Western musician.